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SmallGyfts

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We would like to thank you for your ongoing support of the Amherstburg Freedom Museum, especially during Black History Month.

Here is one more way that you can help us earn donations for the museum. Click this link, https://www.smallgyfts.com/dpl.asp?c=219, to sign up for SmallGyfts.

When you do you can earn donations for the museum when you shop with local businesses that offer SmallGyfts. The first 100 people to signup will earn $1 for the museum.”

Please call the museum at 519-736-5433 if you have any questions. Thank you for your continued support.

MK WhelanSmallGyfts
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Bag Tags

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Are you looking for the perfect stocking stuffer for friends and family? We’re here to help! The Amherstburg Freedom Museum is offering this embossed bag tag that features the Amherstburg Freedom Museum logo. Put it on your luggage, golf bag, backpack or purse. The possibilities are endless!

All you have to do is give a donation of $35 and this bag tag will be yours, along with a $15 tax receipt. The tag has a brown leather strap and a nickel medallion with the Amherstburg Freedom Museum logo surrounded by a border of leather. The medallion with surrounding leather (not including the strap) measures 88.9mm x 77.6mm.

To order, please call 519-736-5433. Quantities are limited! Happy shopping!

 

MK WhelanBag Tags
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Sharing Our Stories

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The Underground Railroad: Next Stop Freedom

Deborah Brown tells the true story of her heroic flight from a life of slavery in Maryland to her new life of freedom in 19th-century Toronto. This video presentation was created by Parks Canada in partnership with the Ontario Black History Society and the Royal Ontario Museum.


Sharing Our Stories

Listen as Fred Johnson recalls the history of his family, told to him by his father about his grandfather, Gabriel Timberlake, who was enslaved in Kentucky.

An abolitionist working as an overseer suggested Timberlake, then 19 years old, run away with others who were planning an escape. Aided by Quakers and supporters, the young man chose to risk his life like so many others, in a bid for freedom. They followed the north star by wagon, foot and boat, determined to elude bounty hunters and slave catchers until they crossed the Detroit River to Amherstburg.

Learn more about our history at #Amherstburg Freedom Museum.

Listen to Kimberly Simmons tell the history of her great great great grandmother, Caroline Quarlls Watkins, the first Underground Railroad “passenger” in Wisconsin who made it to freedom in Canada.

MK WhelanSharing Our Stories
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Mac Simpson’s Word ‘Prophetic’

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In 1964 I returned to Amherstburg – the town of my birth, and was disturbed by the Black awareness that haunted me.  There existed so many negative features in the community such as, restricted housing, people without jobs, children poorly educated, poor living standards – and no one seemed to care.

Monty LoganMac Simpson’s Word ‘Prophetic’
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